Letting the Frame Speak for the Artist and the Era

"The art world equivalent of Ginger Rogers — in the sense of making the main attraction look good — frames have long subtly shaped the viewer’s experience while being taken for granted."

In "Letting the Frame Speak for the Artist and the Era" by the New York Times, we are reintroduced to an important element of any artwork - the frame. From antique frames to modern day styles, the art of framing comes alive once again, as a leading player in the art world.

"But now frames are experiencing a renaissance of attention and respect from both museum curators and collectors. “I don’t remember a single discussion of frames in graduate school,” said Mark Cole, curator of American paintings and sculpture at the Cleveland Museum of Art. “Now frames are increasingly seen as rich areas of study and as precious historic objects that must be preserved.”

                                                          “Twilight in the Wilderness” (1860), by Frederic Edwin Church, with a replacement mid-19th-century frame. 

                                                          “Twilight in the Wilderness” (1860), by Frederic Edwin Church, with a replacement mid-19th-century frame.